Section 1: Dave’s Intro

Dave Volek:

Welcome to Deli Chickens.

This main objective of this online activity is give you some exposure to language structures used when describing graphs and charts and making predictions.

Assistant

The setting for Deli Chickens is a grocery store in the city of Lethbridge, Canada in the month of April. . . . . Why is Lethbridge so important, you ask? Well, in the spring, Lethbridge can have very big changes in weather. Lethbridge can have a very windy day followed by a calm day. It can be cold and snowy one day, and sunny and hot the next day. These weather changes are needed to create a very exciting business English activity for you.. . . . . Why is the weather so important, you ask? Well, the weather has a lot to do with how many roasted chickens are sold in a day. Certain weather conditions generate lots of chicken sales. Other weather conditions do not encourage customers to buy chickens for reasons we do not understand.

Dave Volek

The deli manager predicts how many chickens are likely to be sold. The deli then prepares that number of chickens by thawing, spicing, and cooking. The store hopes the prediction is reasonably accurate because if too many are prepared, the excess chickens go to waste. If too few chickens are prepared, then chicken-buying customers become annoyed if no chicken is available for sale.

Assistant

So, at about 9:00 a.m., the deli manager steps outside to check the outside weather conditions and looks at three charts that compare chicken sales against weather conditions. These charts have actual data from previous years. There is one chart for temperature, one for wind, and one for sky conditions. So the manager can compare today’s weather against historical chicken sales.

Use the graphs to help you follow the dialogue and make decisions about how many chickens to prepare. Click “Graphs” in the upper right corner.

Dave Volek

The manager and her two assistants will interpret these charts to make a prediction. You too can make a prediction. Download the charts to follow the dialogue. When the deli workers are done speaking, you can enter your prediction of how many chickens the store’s deli should prepare for today. So while you are practicing your business English listening, you also get to test your business skills.

Assistant

But the business goal of this exercise is not to guess the right number of chickens. It is to guess the number of chickens that will earn the most profits. can you earn more profit than Darlene, Willy, and Shirley?

Dave Volek

Here is how the profits are calculated.

Rule #1: All prepared chickens will cost the store $3.50 regardless of whether they are sold or not.

Assistant

Rule #2: Each chicken sold earns the store $9.99 in revenue.

Dave Volek

Rule #3: There is a penalty if the deli under prepares the number of chickens. That penalty is calculated in this way. After the deli team and business English learner make their decisions, I will announce how many chickens could have been sold with the current weather conditions. If the deli team or learner prepares less than that number, this difference becomes the penalty for the next turn. This difference represents the number of angry customers who will not be buying chickens in the next turn of this business game. In other words, the difference means fewer chicken sales in the next turn. And fewer chicken sales means lower profit.

Assistant

A good strategy is to prepare a few more chickens than you think you need so that you don’t get this penalty. But don’t prepare too many more.

Dave Volek

So let’s go to our first round.

  True False
1. Lethbridge was chosen as the setting for Deli Chickens because the people of Lethbridge like eating more roasted chickens than anywhere else in Canada.
2. Weather affects the roasted chicken sales.
3. The three charts compare chicken sales against the day of the week.
4. Even if a chicken is not prepared for today, it costs the store $3.50.
5. The penalty is calculated by the sum of the chickens prepared and the possible chicken sales.
 
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