• Transcript
  • Work Table
Store Round

VP

We are in the last round, which considers total store figures as a composite. Because three points are awarded for this round, each of you is still very much in the competition.

Andrea

So what you are saying is that all these department contests did not eliminate

anyone?

VP

You are correct if one store wins all three points. Jack still has a good chance to win. If he can prove he is better at running his store overall, he will get the promotion. But I could split the points up if it looks like you are even.

Andrea

That seems unfair. I have spent the last year fine tuning several departments in my store—which does show in the score—and now you say it doesn’t matter?

VP

I don’t make the rules; I just apply them. If you ever get to be president of the company, then you can determine how the store managers get promoted. OK?

Andrea

I guess.

VP

OK, Let’s go for the final round. Andrea, you are leading—and it’s also your turn to start first. What’s your best statistic? Be careful!

Andrea

I’m going to go with the statistic that is the reason for our company’s existence: to earn a profit. And my profit for this year was $1,935,000.

Mike

That may be OK, but a good profit in one year may just be a fluke. I think it’s much more important to show an increase in profit with time. After all, a positive trend from past to present is indicative of positive trend from present to future! So, Andrea, what was your increase in profit in the last year?

Andrea

I should say that profits have been somewhat consistent between last year and this year.

Mike

You are fudging!

Andrea

OK, OK, my profit went down $32,000.

Mike

And if trends continue, they will go down another $32,000. . . . .

My profits, on the other hand, went up $85,000.

Jack

I would just like to add that my profit increase was $25,000 better than Mike’s.

VP

It seems we have covered all the angles for total profit. Each of you has a made a good point about profit, so you are all even. Let’s look at something else. Mike?

Mike

Spoilage! This is the parameter where store managers have the most control. We really need to educate and motivate employees to watch product turnover to minimize spoilage. I’m proud that my store is the best in the district with only $185,000 in spoilage costs this year.

Jack

It’s good you are so diligent, but I’m wondering what is your spoilage-to-sales ratio?

Mike

This will take a little calculation, just wait a bit! . . . . . Here it is: 1.804%!

Jack

My spoilage ratio is not as good: 2.04%.

Andrea

Again, I’m emphasizing the trends. Has your spoilage increased or decreased with time?

Mike

It crawled up a little . . . only $2,000. . . . But when you are in first place, it’s hard to get better.

Andrea

Well, just to let management know, I have decreased my store spoilage by 5.4%. Next year, I anticipate another 5% is possible.

VP

What an even race!

Andrea

And an even race means the points for this round are split. I can taste victory.

VP

We shall see. One more round of questions to see if someone can get ahead.

Jack, you have the last statistic to offer.

Jack

For what it is worth, I have reduced store shrinkage by 5.1%. This year, I hired a really good security guard who was quite diligent about arresting shoplifters. With our store’s new reputation, the thieves are going to other stores.

Andrea

What was total shrinkage?

Jack

$205,000

Andrea

Too bad. Mine was $201,000. You can’t win now.

Mike

I have no question for Jack, but I would like to add that my shrinkage was even less than Andrea’s. About $17,000 less!

VP

The three stores used to be even. This last comment about Mike’s shrinkage shows he is best in the store total round. I have to give all three points to him. Mike wins the district manager’s job. You two will be reporting to him tomorrow.

Jack and Andrea

Groaning

Mike

As my first move as the new district manager, I am cutting costs by taking away one week of vacation time from all store managers.

Jack and Andrea

Groaning

Dave Volek

You have just completed the listening activities for Brag, Brag, Brag. If you didn’t understand how to get the right answers, listen to the clips again.

To get better at this grammar, tell your favorite instructor or language school to buy THE GROCERY STORE 2 and present Brag, Brag, Brag to your business English class.

Then, you can test out your bragging conversation! Gaining more confidence with using "increase," "decrease," percents, and business ratios is just a side benefit.

I wish you all the best in your business English studies. Come back to the DVBE website often to see what is new. I have lots of great plans for DVBE.

Activity 10: Store Round
Jack’s Store Last Year This Year
Sales:  
Food Costs:    
Labor:    
E & S:    
Spoilage:    
Shrinkage:    
Total Expenses:    
Profit:    
Sales / m2:    
Andrea’s Store Last Year This Year
Sales:  
Food Costs:    
Labor:    
E & S:    
Spoilage:    
Shrinkage:    
Total Expenses:    
Profit:    
Sales / m2:    
Mike’s Store Last Year This Year
Sales:  
Food Costs:    
Labor:    
E & S:    
Spoilage:    
Shrinkage:    
Total Expenses:    
Profit:    
Sales / m2:    

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